Robbery crimes in Arizona are aggressively prosecuted by the state because they are considered crimes against a victim, and may sometimes involve the use of an accomplice or a dangerous weapon. The definition of robbery in the state is very broad and encompassing, so it is important to understand what constitutes a robbery in Arizona and what circumstances may aggravate a robbery charge.

What Is Considered a Robbery in Arizona?

Generally speaking, robbery is the crime of attempting to take someone else’s property while the property owner is present. The person committing the robbery has clear intentions of taking the item against the owner’s will and may use force or intimidation to reach that goal.

A person can be charged with armed robbery when a firearm or dangerous weapon was used for the crime. Aggravated robbery is another possible charge when the crime included an accomplice to steal items. All robbery charges carry the potential of a long jail sentence and expensive fines.

Can You Be Charged With Robbery Even if You Didn’t Steal Anything?

You can be charged with robbery even if nothing was actually stolen. In Arizona, the prosecution simply needs to prove that the intent to commit robbery was present. You may be charged with robbery or aggravated robbery simply by acting in a threatening manner with the intention to take a victim’s property with the victim present, even if you don’t actually end up taking anything.

When Is a Robbery Considered a Felony in Arizona?

Robberies are always considered a felony in Arizona. The severity of the charges depends on the number of items stolen, their monetary value, and any aggravating circumstances such as whether a weapon was used to commit the crime or not. Robbery crimes without any aggravating circumstances may typically be charged as a Class 4 Felony, exposing a defendant to possible jail time, fines and restitution, with harsher penalties for repeat offenders. Armed robbery is a Class 2 felony that may result in up to 10 years in prison.

If you are facing a robbery charge, working with a theft crimes attorney may make a positive impact on your case. An attorney can present mitigating factors to convince the court to downgrade your charges and, when possible, allow for alternative sentences such as community service instead of jail time. At the Naegle Law Firm, PLC, we have assisted many clients dealing with a robbery charge to achieve a better outcome for their case. We are here to help — contact our Mesa office by calling (480) 378-9000 and speaking to our legal team.